Yoga and Weight Reduction

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Regular yoga practice can aid you in body-fat management. Firstly, some of the yoga poses stimulate poor performing glands to increase their hormonal secretions.

The thyroid gland, especially, has a big effect on our weight because it affects body metabolism.

If the metabolism is slow, this hinders your body’s natural ability to use body fat efficiently for energy. There are several poses, such as the shoulder stand and the fish pose, which are specific for the thyroid gland. Fat metabolism is also increased, so fat is burned in the furnace of the muscle cell. Yoga also tones and strengthens the muscles, and muscles, being metabolically active, will increase the amount of body fat used for energy.

Yoga reduces anxiety, and so tends to reduce anxious eating. Which we all realize, is overeating. When under nervous strain we tend to swallow our food without getting satisfaction. We end up eating more. If, on the other hand, we approach our meals with thought, we tend to be less likely to overeat in an effort to quiet our anxieties.

Lastly, yoga aids may be employed between meals whenever you become tempted to search for a snack. You can turn to yoga, rather than to the snacks, when you feel the need for a lift or relief from restless nervousness.

Practicing yoga will make you positive about reducing body fat.

If you are not overweight, your weight will remain about the same. If you are underweight, you will gain weight. The weight you gain will be healthy firm muscle tissue, not fat. That is, yoga will tend to produce the ideal body structure for you. This is due to yoga’s effect of fixing glandular activity.

For those whose eating habits, whether at meals or between meals, are believed to be due to feelings of weakness rather than anxieties, most yoga poses and breathing exercises are designed to increase your strength.

Hence, they may relieve feelings of weakness more effectively than additional eating. The exercises themselves, although consuming some energy, also store up energy which, when combined with oxidizing breathing, provide energy that is ready for use rather than for storage.